Bear and Lion go to a Santa Run


Last Sunday Bear and Lion went for a walk in Greenwich Park and ran into a lot of Santas… running.

Santa run


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Bear and Lion go to Greenwich Park, London 2012 Olympics


Bear and Lion have just come back from a whirlwind holiday (photos coming soon!). But they made it back just in time to visit Greenwich Park where the London 2012 equestrian events were held.


A 13 hour flight and 2 hour travel across London from Heathrow airport made Bear and Lion a little tired so they didn’t stay too long. They’re well rested now and can’t wait to share their adventures with you soon.


Hope you’ve all been enjoying your summer so far too!


Bear and Lion Go to The Queen’s Gallery at Buckingham Palace

Bear and Lion went to see Leonardo da Vinci’s drawings of the human body at the Queen’s Gallery in Buckingham Palace. Except they weren’t always of the human body, he drew birds and cows and bears too!

They didn’t see the Queen though. The Queen never seems to be around. Last time Bear and Lion went to the Queen’s House, and she wasn’t there either.


Click here to see photos of Bear and Lion at the Leonardo Da Vinci Anatomist exhibition at the Queen’s Gallery.


What are Dreams, Boyfriend?


“What are dreams?” Lion asked the Boyfriend.

“They’re images in your head,” he told Lion.

“What are images?” asked Lion.

“It’s like having TV in your head,” the Boyfriend replied. “But only when you’re sleeping.


“I don’t sleep,” said Lion, who genuinely believed he didn’t sleep. “I’m a guardian angel. You sleep and I guard.”

“Well,” said the Boyfriend, “you don’t have to worry about dreams, then. But that’s what dreams are.”


Caught on camera

This is what happens when conservationists set up some camera traps in a reserve on the Afghan border.

Curious snow leopard cub. Image: Panthera/FFI

This snow leopard cub took quite a liking to one of the cameras and ran off with it. This is obviously a common problem – being caught by surprise on camera that is – and Bear and Lion aren’t immune to it.


Read more about the conservationists’ work at Wired.co.uk.